Important information about Indian Rupee:

The Indian Rupee with its symbol ₹ and code INR is the national currency of India. And currently its market regulator and issuer is the Reserve Bank of India. The Indian Rupee emblem was chosen on 15 July 2010, designed by Professor D. Uday Kumar, IIT, Guwahati. India is the fifth country in the world, which is recognized by its symbol.

The word Rupee in India has its origin in the Sanskrit word rupa or rupyah, which means silver and rupyakam, meaning silver coin. The term was first used by Sher Shah Suri during his reign in India from 1540 to 1545. And this word was in vogue in India even during the British Raj.

Languages used in Indian currency:

A total of 17 languages ​​have been written in all the notes of Indian Rupee, which shows that its quantity has been written in 17 languages. On the obverse, the sect is written in English and Hindi. On the reverse is a language panel that displays the denomination of the note in 15 of the 22 official languages ​​of India. The languages ​​are displayed in alphabetical order. The empaneled languages ​​are Assamese, Bengali, Gujarati, Kannada, Kashmiri, Konkani, Malayalam, Marathi, Nepali, Odia, Punjabi, Sanskrit, Tamil, Telugu and Urdu.

History of Indian Rupee:

In 1862, a series of banknotes and coins with Victoria's portrait were issued in honor of Queen Victoria. After which the first Reserve Bank of India was established in the year 1935, the Reserve Bank of India was given the right to issue Government of India notes. The Reserve Bank also printed a note of Rs 10,000 and but it was discontinued after independence. The first currency note issued by RBI was the Rs 5 note with the picture of King George VI on it.

This note was printed in 1938. After independence in 1947 and when India became a republic in 1950, the modern Indian rupee regained its design. The top pillar of Ashoka bearing the Chaturmukh Singh of Sarnath was chosen for the paper note. It replaced George VI's being printed on banknotes. Thus the first banknote printed in independent India was the Re 1 note.

Important information of all Indian currency notes:

Important information about Indian ₹1 note:

  • Currently, it is the smallest Indian banknote in circulation.
  • It is the only note to be issued by the Government of India.
  • This note bears the signature of the Finance Secretary.
  • At present, this note issued by the Government of India is 97 mm in width and 63 mm in height.
  • The picture of Sagar Samrat oil rig is displayed on it.

Important information about Indian ₹2 note:

  • This note was the second smallest Indian note.
  • It was introduced in 1943 and withdrawn from circulation in 1995.

Important information about Indian ₹5 note:

  • It is the second smallest Indian note currently in circulation by the Reserve Bank of India.
  • The Reserve Bank of India introduced the Rs 5 banknote in the Mahatma Gandhi series from the year 1996.
  • But the printing of notes in these denominations has been stopped by the Reserve Bank of India.

Important information about Indian ₹10 note:

  • The ₹10 note issued by the Reserve Bank of India has a width of 123 mm and a height of 63 mm.
  • The base color of the note is chocolate brown.
  • Historical number 10 in Devanagari displayed on the note
  • In the center of the note is a portrait of Mahatma Gandhi.
  • 'RBI', 'Bharat', 'INDIA' and '10' are written in micro letters on the note.
  • The demonetised security thread is 'India' and RBI with inscriptions on the note.
  • The Ashoka Pillar is displayed on the right side of the note.
  • Mahatma Gandhi portrait on the note and ₹10 inscription by electrotype, both displayed by watermark.
  • The numbers on the note move along the number panel from top to left and from left to right, going down.
  • The year of printing of the note is written on the left side of the note.
  • Like other Indian Rupee banknotes, the ₹10 banknote has its amount written in 17 languages.

Important information about Indian ₹20 note:

  • The Reserve Bank of India on 26 April 2019 has announced that it will soon launch a new 20 note will be issued.
  • The ₹20 note issued by the Reserve Bank of India has a width of 129 mm and a height of 63 mm.
  • The base color of the note is greenish-yellow.
  • This note has Braille facility for the visually impaired.
  • On the reverse side of note is the famous Mount Harriet in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands.
  • The note has the latent image of the denomination of the banknote on the vertical band next to the right hand side of Mahatma Gandhi's portrait.
  • Watermark of Mahatma Gandhi on the note which is a mirror image of the main portrait.
  • Like other Indian Rupee banknotes, the ₹20 banknote has its amount written in 17 languages.
  • The number panel of this banknote is printed in embedded fluorescent fiber and optionally variable ink.

Important information about Indian ₹50 note:

  • This note was officially announced on 18 August 2017 and is currently in circulation.
  • The new version of the note depicts Hampi with a chariot on the reverse.
  • The ₹50 note issued by the Reserve Bank of India has a width of 135 mm and a height of 66 mm.
  • The base color of the note is Fluorescent Blue.
  • The note features other designs, geometric patterns, which align with the overall color scheme.
  • The note has the latent image of the denomination of the banknote on the vertical band next to the right hand side of Mahatma Gandhi's portrait.
  • Gandhi's watermark on the note which is a mirror image of the main portrait.
  • The number panel of this banknote is printed in embedded fluorescent fiber and optionally variable ink.
  • Like other Indian Rupee banknotes, the ₹50 banknote has its amount written in 17 languages.

Important information about Indian ₹100 note:

  • On 10 November 2016, the Reserve Bank of India announced the introduction of a new redesignated ₹100 banknote as a part of the Mahatma Gandhi New Series.
  • On 19 July 2018, Reserve Bank of India unveiled the revised design of ₹100 banknote.
  • The new banknote has a picture of Rani ki Vav on the reverse side.
  • The base color of the note is lavender.
  • Rani Ki Vav, Patan is located in Patan district, Gujarat, India. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The ₹100 note issued by the Reserve Bank of India measures 142 mm in width and 66 mm in height.
  • It features Braille script to assist the visually impaired in identifying currency.
  • On the note from the reverse side there is a view of Goicha La, a high mountain pass in Sikkim, India and located in the Himalayan range.
  • On the vertical band next to the right hand side of Mahatma Gandhi's portrait on the note is the latent image of the denomination of the banknote.
  • Watermark of Mahatma Gandhi on the note which is a mirror image of the main portrait.
  • The number panel of this banknote is printed in embedded fluorescent fiber and optionally variable ink.
  • Like other Indian Rupee banknotes, the ₹100 banknote has its amount written in 17 languages.

Important information about Indian ₹200 note:

  • The ₹200 note issued by the Reserve Bank of India measures 142 mm in width and 66 mm in height.
  • On 25 August 2017, the Reserve Bank of India introduced ₹200 banknote, a new note in the Mahatma Gandhi series.
  • The new version of this note has a depiction of Sanchi Stupa on the reverse, depicting the cultural heritage of the country.
  • The base color of this note is Bright Yellow.
  • As announced by the Reserve Bank of India, the new ₹200 denomination banknotes were issued in circulation from 25 August 2017 on the occasion of
  • Ganesh Chaturthi.
  • Like other Indian Rupee banknotes, the ₹200 banknote has its amount written in 17 languages.

Important information about Indian ₹500 note:

  • The previous banknotes of the Mahatma Gandhi series between 2016 were demonetised on November 8, 2016.
  • The Indian ₹500 banknote is a denomination of the Indian rupee.
  • The current ₹500 banknote, in circulation since 10 November 2016, is a part of the
  • Mahatma Gandhi New Series.
  • The ₹500 note issued by the Reserve Bank of India has a width of 150 mm and a height of 66 mm.
  • It has Braille facility to assist the visually impaired in identifying the currency.
  • On this note there is a latent image of him with the avyakt number 500.
  • 'RBI' and '500' are written in micro letter on the left side of this banknote.
  • When this note is bent, the color of the thread changes from green to blue.
  • The denomination numeral, along with the Rs 500 symbol on this note, is displayed in color-changing ink (green to blue) on the bottom right.
  • The base color of this note is Stone Grey.
  • The note bears the Ashoka Pillar emblem on the right side along with the portrait of
  • Mahatma Gandhi on the Electrotype 500 watermark.
  • The reverse side of the note bears the Indian heritage site of the Red Fort and a tag line of the Swachh Bharat Abhiyan.
  • The number panel of this banknote is printed in embedded fluorescent fiber and optionally variable ink.
  • Like other Indian Rupee banknotes, the ₹500 banknote has its amount written in 17 languages.

Important information about Indian ₹1000 note:

  • On 8 November 2016, Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced that all ₹1000 notes of Mahatma Gandhi series would not be accepted as legal tender from November 2016.
  • Like other Indian rupee banknotes, the ₹1000 banknote had its amount written in 17 languages.
  • The width of this note was 177 mm and the height was 73 mm.

Important information about Indian ₹2000 note:

  • It was introduced by the Reserve Bank of India on 8 November 2016 after the ₹1000 note was discontinued.
  • It is India's highest note printed in active currency by Reserve Bank of India.
  • The ₹2000 note issued by the Reserve Bank of India has a width of 166 mm and a height of 66 mm.
  • The base color of this note is magenta.
  • This note has Braille print to aid the visually impaired in identifying the currency.
  • On the reverse side of this note is a form of Mangalyaan, which represents India's first interplanetary space mission.
  • On this note is the logo and tag line for Swachh Bharat Abhiyan.
  • 2000 is written on this note in Devanagari.
  • The micro letters 'RBI' and '2000' are written on the left side of this banknote.
  • When this note is bent, the color of its thread changes from green to blue.
  • The yen note guarantee clause, the promise clause with the governor's signature, and the RBI insignia displayed on the right.
  • The note bears the emblem on the Ashoka Pillar, Mahatma Gandhi portrait and Electrotype (2000) watermark.
  • The note uses intaglio (raised printing) of Mahatma Gandhi portrait, Ashoka Pillar emblem, bleed line and identification mark for the visually impaired.
  • The year of printing of the note is written on the left side of the note.

Now practice related questions and see what you learnt?

Indian Currency GK Questions and Answers 🔗

Read also:

Indian Currency Languages FAQs:

The watermark on the note is of Mahatma Gandhi which is a mirror image of the main portrait. The number panel of this banknote is printed in embedded fluorescent fiber and optically variable ink. Like other Indian rupee banknotes, the ₹100 banknote has its amount written in 17 languages.

The Reserve Bank of India issues notes according to the minimum reserve system, in which since 1957, the RBI has to maintain gold and foreign exchange reserves of Rs 200 crore at all times, of which at least Rs 115 crore should be in gold reserves. .

Decimation of India's currency system took place in the year 1957. Additionally, the 'Victoria Portrait Series' notes were the first paper currency officially launched by the government.

Medium of Exchange: The primary function of money is that it acts as a medium of exchange. This means that people can buy and sell goods and services with the help of money. Money is received by the seller of the commodity and money is paid by the buyer of the commodity.

Internal prices often fall due to devaluation. Devaluation is a part of economic terminology; When the exchange rate of currency is reduced by a country from the currencies of other countries in order to encourage investment, it is called devaluation.

  Last update :  Fri 7 Apr 2023
  Post Views :  13623
  Post Category :  Indian Economics